River Walks

River Walks

Walking is what makes our heart sing. Walking along rivers to engage with people and activate them to care for rivers. We go step by step, river by river, engaging people and activating them to care for a world with drinkable rivers. Experience, love, care. That’s what we believe in.
Meuse 2018

Meuse 2018

Key Facts

  • 60 days
  • 1061 kilometers
  • 60 measurements with children and locals
  • 500 co-walkers

Li An Phoa walked the Meuse from source-to-sea, crossing three countries: France, Belgium and the Netherlands. Every night she was hosted by local people. In total more than two hundred people, ‘Meuse Angels’, supported this walk.

Amstel 2019

Amstel 2019

Key Facts

  • 2 days
  • 35 kilometres
  • 4 measurements with children and locals
  • 20 co-walkers

In Autumn 2019, Li An walked the river Amstel. Besides the friends and locals that joined part of the walk, she walked together with Kate Moore and Quirine Winkler for 35km, from the start at the sluice in Nieuwveen to Muntplein in the city center of Amsterdam. The whole walk was visualised by an app initiated by art collective LUDWIG in collaboration with Drinkable Rivers.

Watch the video of day 1 and 2

IJmeer 2020

IJmeer 2020

Key Facts

  • 1 day 30kms
  • 1 measurement
  • 12 co-walkers

Together with StrandLab Almere we explored the lake IJmeer. Visualised by the Waterwalks app from LUDWIG. During the 30-km day walk, local people and professionals joined parts of the walk: Mark Banga (harbour master Marina Muiderzand and tree expert), Kevin van Drumpt (water mayor Almere), Jochgem van Dijk (Stad & Natuur), Thijn Westermann (Groen Muiderberg), Maarten Ouboter (Waterschap Amstel, Gooi en Vecht en Waternet), Herman Zonderland (stedenbouwkundige Gemeente Amsterdam), Annette van Driel (UrbanCampsite IJburg), and Suzan Huppes (Lolaland) and six locals like Robert Borghuis and Quirine Winkler (water programme maker) met with Jaap Porsius (havenmeester Durgerdam), Kadir van Lohuizen (fotograaf). The active locals from IJburg have become a new Drinkable Rivers citizen science hub.